Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction Shortlist Announced!

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The American Library Association today announced the six books shortlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction, awarded for the previous year’s best fiction and nonfiction books written for adult readers and published in the United States. The two medal winners will be announced by selection committee chair Nancy Pearl at the RUSA’s Book and Media Awards event at ALA Midwinter Meeting & Exhibits in Boston on Sunday, January 10.

2016 shortlisted titles include:

Nonfiction

H is for Hawk,” by Helen Macdonald, published  by Grove Press, an imprint of Grove Atlantic, and distributed by Publishers Group West.

Hold Still: A Memoir in Photographs,” by Sally Mann, published by Little, Brown, and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World,” by Andrea Wulf, published by published by Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, LLC. New York.

Fiction

The Book of Aron,” by Jim Shepard, published by Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, LLC. New York.

A Little Life: A Novel,” by Hanya Yanagihara, published by Doubleday, a division of Random House, LLC. New York.

The Sympathizer,” by Viet Thanh Nguyen, published by Grove Press, an imprint of Grove Atlantic, and distributed by Publishers Group West.

This is the first time the Carnegie Medal winner announcements will be made at Midwinter Meeting & Exhibits, reflecting a new calendar for the awards, with the shortlist announced in October, the winners in January, and the popular celebratory event continuing at ALA Annual Conference each year. Winning authors each receive $5,000, and the four finalists each receive $1,500.

The awards, established in 2012, recognize the best fiction and nonfiction books for adult readers published in the U.S. in the previous year and serve as a guide to help adults select quality reading material. They are the first single-book awards for adult books given by the American Library Association and reflect the expert judgment and insight of library professionals who work closely with adult readers.

The Medals are made possible, in part, by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York in recognition of Andrew Carnegie’s deep belief in the power of books and learning to change the world, and are co-sponsored by ALA’s Booklist Publications and the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA).

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS: 2016 REFERENCE RESEARCH FORUM

The Research & Statistics Committee of the Reference Services Section of the Reference & User Services Association (RUSA) invites the submission of reference service research project proposals for presentation at the 22nd Reference Research Forum at the 2016 American Library Association Annual Conference in Orlando, FL. Researchers and practitioners from all types of libraries, library school faculty and students, and other interested individuals are encouraged to submit a proposal.

The Reference Research Forum is a popular and valuable ALA Annual Conference program. Attendees have the opportunity to learn about innovative research projects conducted in reference services including user behavior, electronic services, reference effectiveness and assessment, and organizational structure and personnel.

For examples of projects presented at past Forums, please see the Committee’s website:
http://connect.ala.org/node/245010

The Committee employs a blind review process to select three projects for 20-minute presentations, followed by open discussion. Selected submissions must be presented in person at the Forum in Orlando, FL.

Criteria for selection:

1.      Originality: Potential for research to fill a gap in reference knowledge or to build on previous studies

2.      Quality: Research design and methodologies

3.      Impact: Significance of the study for improving the quality of reference service

NOTE: Research projects may be in-progress or completed. Previously published research or research accepted for publication will not be accepted.

Important Dates:

Proposals are due by December 28th, 2015. Notification of acceptance will be made by Monday, February 8th, 2016.
The submission must not exceed two pages. Please include:

Submission Details:

PAGE 1: Cover Sheet (1 page maximum)
Include your name(s), title(s), institutional affiliation(s), mailing address(es), and email address(es).

PAGE 2: Research Description (1 page maximum)
The second page must not show your name, any personal information, or the name of your institution. Instead, it must include:

1.      Title of the project

2.      Explicit statement of the research problem

3.      Description of the research design and methodologies

4.      Findings or results if available

5.      Brief discussion of the originality, unique contribution, potential impact, and significance of the research
(if you use semi colons between itemsin a list, you need to make sure the entire list is a complete sentence.)

Proposals that exceed 2 pages or that do not follow the format described above will be automatically rejected.
Please submit your proposal as a PDF document. Thank you for your cooperation in following submission rules.

Please send submissions by email to:
Elizabeth Kocevar-Weidinger
Learning Services Librarian
ekocevarweidinger@hcc.edu
Howard Community College

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Membership blog, RUSA Voices looking for bloggers!

The latest addition to RUSA is the new membership blog, “RUSA Voices“. We are looking for all RUSA and non-RUSA folks to contribute to share experiences, ideas and concerns with colleagues and fellow librarians.

A message from Editor David Midyette:

Writing a blog post can be simple. Your colleagues want to hear from you about your trials and tribulations, your successes and challenges, but mostly, they just want to hear what’s important to you in your professional lives. While RUSA is focused on reference and user services, that is still an incredibly broad category, and provides innumerable options for sharing of information. How is your transition to LibGuides 2.0 coming? What are your challenges in collecting quantitative and qualitative data to prove your worth? What new reference services are red hot topics? How are old concepts and techniques being applied in new and novel ways? Is Google still putting us out of business or is it just reshaping how we help people connect to information?

Still not convinced? Send me an email or give me a call! I’ll help you work through the process of putting fingers to keys. It really can be as simple as sitting down and typing out your string of consciousness about a topic. We can work from there to refine and shape your writing. Heck, it may be perfect the way it is! The point is that you have a Voice and it needs to be heard. You may think to yourself that you have nothing interesting or novel to say (I know I listened to my inner voice saying that for far too long), but in truth, you have a lot to say and it WILL interest people. While many of us live at the bleeding edge of technology, others bide their time and wait to see how these new technologies express themselves through patron usage. Twitter is an awesome tool, but it has changed immensely from the beginning. Think about what you do on a daily basis and simply report on some of the unique things, even if they seem mundane.

I love editing people’s writing and helping them shape their ideas. Send me something and let me help you get started. Write a blog post for RUSA Voices and put it in your resume. Posts can be more academic or more practical in orientation; it’s up to you and your interests. You don’t have to agonize over things, just get something down and send it in; we will go from there together . . . We will make sure that your colleagues hear your Voice and share what you have to say! I look forward to working with you, now sit down and write something!

David (dmidyette@roseman.edu)
Editor, RUSA Voices